Faculty

Paint School faculty for 2017 includes:
Josephine Halvorson, Byron Kim, Ulrike Müller, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold


Josephine Halvorson

Josephine Halvorson makes art in relation to a particular object and place. For the last decade she has worked from observation, painting on site throughout the United States and abroad. Transcribing her perceptions in real time through the medium of color, her paintings describe the physical appearance of a subject at-hand, while also expressing that which is invisible yet nonetheless felt: locale, time, history, and emotion. Halvorson’s artistic practice foregrounds attention and experience, taking the form of painting and also sculpture, printmaking and drawing.

Josephine Halvorson grew up on Cape Cod, where she first studied art on the beaches of Provincetown and with Barnet Rubenstein at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She attended The Cooper Union School of Art (BFA, 2003), Yale Norfolk (2002), and continued her interdisciplinary education at Columbia University’s School of the Arts (MFA, 2007). Halvorson has been granted three yearlong fellowships in Europe: the United States Fulbright to Vienna, Austria (2003-4), the Harriet Hale Woolley at the Fondation des États-Unis, Paris, France (2007-8), and as the first American to receive the Rome Prize at the French Academy at the Villa Medici, Rome, Italy (2014-2015). She is the recipient of several awards, including the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award (2009) and a New York Foundation for the Arts award in Painting (2010), and has been awarded residencies at Moly-Sabata in Sablons, France (2014, 2017) and the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation in Captiva, Florida (2016).

Halvorson’s work has been exhibited widely and is represented by Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York, and Peter Freeman, Inc., Paris. In 2015 she presented her first museum survey exhibition, Slow Burn, at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, curated by Cora Fisher. In 2016 she exhibited large-scale painted sculptures at Storm King Art Center, as part of the Outlooks series curated by Nora Lawrence. Her work has been written about extensively in various publications and she is one of the subjects of Art21's documentary series, New York Close Up.

Josephine Halvorson has taught at The Cooper Union, Princeton University, the University of Tennessee Knoxville and Columbia University. She served as Critic and Senior Critic from 2010-2016 at Yale School of Art's MFA program in Painting. In 2016 Halvorson joined Boston University as Professor of Art and Chair of Graduate Studies in Painting. She lives and works out of Western Massachusetts.


Byron Kim

Byron Kim often works in an area one might call the abstract sublime. His work sits at the threshold of abstraction and representation, between conceptualism and pure painting. Kim’s best known work, Synecdoche, was included in the 1993 Whitney Biennial. Comprising a grid of hundreds of panels depicting human skin color, the painting is both an abstract monochrome and a group portrait. Once a week since 2001, Kim has made a small painting of the sky on which he inscribes a few momentary thoughts.
Born in 1961, Kim is a Senior Critic at Yale University. He received a BA from Yale University in 1983 and attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1986. His work is in the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Art Institute of Chicago, IL; the Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley, CA; the Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, TX; the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington D.C.; the M+ Museum, Hong Kong; the Museum of Contemporary Art, La Jolla, CA; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; the Norton Family Collection, Santa Monica, CA; the Pérez Art Museum, Miami; the Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford, CT; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; the Whitney Museum of American Art, NY; and the Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA. Byron Kim lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Byron Kim, born in 1961 in La Jolla, CA, is a Senior Critic at Yale School of Art and lives in Brooklyn, NY. He received a BA in English from Yale College in 1983 and attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1986. Kim is best known for his painting, Synecdoche, which was included in the 1993 Whitney Biennial. Comprised of a grid of hundreds of panels depicting human skin color, the work is both an abstract painting in monochromes and a group portrait. His ongoing series of Sunday Paintings, in which he records the appearance of the sky every week along with a diary entry, juxtaposes the cosmological with the quotidian.

Kim often works in an area one might call the abstract sublime. His work sits at the threshold between abstraction and representation, between conceptualism and pure painting. Kim’s paintings often appear to be pure abstractions, but upon investigation, they reveal a charged space that often connects to the artist’s personal experiences in relation to larger cultural forces. Among Kim’s numerous awards are the Louise Nevelson Award in Art, American Academy of Arts and Letters, NY (1993), the New York Foundation for the Arts Grant and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award (1994), the National Endowment of the Arts Award (1995), the Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant (1997), the Alpert Award in the Arts (2008) and the Guggenheim Fellowship (2017)

His works are in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Art Institute of Chicago, IL; the Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley, CA; the Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, TX; the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington D.C.; the M+ Museum, Hong Kong; the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, La Jolla, CA; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; the Norton Family Collection, Santa Monica, CA; the Pérez Art Museum, Miami; the Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford, CT; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; the Whitney Museum of American Art, NY; and the Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA.


Ulrike Müller

(c) eSeL.at - Lorenz Seidler

Ulrike Müller (born 1971 in Austria, lives in New York) engages relationships between abstraction and bodies and a concept of painting that is not restricted to brush and canvas. Employing a wide range of materials and techniques, including performance, publishing, and textiles, her work moves between different contexts and publics, invites collaboration, and expands to other realms of production in processes of exploration and exchange. Ulrike Müller studied art at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, Austria, and participated in the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, New York. She has been a co-editor of the queer feminist journal, LTTR, and organized Herstory Inventory. 100 Feminist Drawings by 100 Artists, a collaborative project that was exhibited together with objects from the respective collections at the Brooklyn Museum and at the Kunsthaus Bregenz in 2012. In 2010, Müller represented Austria in the Cairo Biennial.


Howardena Pindell

D. James Dee, Howardena Pindell in her studio on Seventh Avenue and 28th Street, New York, c. 1973. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery.

Born in Philadelphia in 1943, Howardena Pindell studied painting at Boston University and Yale University. After graduating, she accepted a job in the Department of Prints and Illustrated Books at the Museum of Modern Art, where she remained for 12 years (1967–1979). In 1979, she began teaching at the State University of New York, Stony Brook where she is now a full professor. Throughout her career, Pindell has exhibited extensively. Notable solo-exhibitions include: Spelman College (1971, Atlanta), A.I.R. Gallery (1973, 1983, New York), Just Above Midtown (1977, New York), Lerner-Heller Gallery (1980, 1981, New York), The Studio Museum in Harlem (1986, New York), the Wadsworth Atheneum (1989, Hartford), Cyrus Gallery (1989, New York), G.R. N’Namdi Gallery (1992, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2002, 2006, Chicago, Detroit, and New York), Garth Greenan Gallery, New York (2014), and Spelman College Museum of Fine Art, Atlanta (2015).

Pindell often employs lengthy, metaphorical processes of destruction/reconstruction. She cuts canvases in strips and sews them back together, building up surfaces in elaborate stages. She paints or draws on sheets of paper, punches out dots from the paper using a paper hole punch, drops the dots onto her canvas, and finally squeegees paint through the “stencil” left in the paper from which she had punched the dots. Almost invariably, her paintings are installed unstretched, held to the wall merely by the strength of a few finishing nails. The artist’s fascination with gridded, serialized imagery, along with surface texture appears throughout her oeuvre. Even in her later, more politically charged work, Pindell reverts to these thematic focuses in order to address social issues of homelessness, AIDs, war, genocide, sexism, xenophobia, and apartheid.

Howardena Pindell’s work has been featured in many landmark museum exhibitions, such as: Contemporary Black Artists in America (1971, Whitney Museum of American Art), Rooms (1976, P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center), Another Generation (1979, The Studio Museum in Harlem), Afro-American Abstraction (1980, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center), The Decade Show: Frameworks of Identity in the 1980s (1990, New Museum of Contemporary Art), and Bearing Witness: Contemporary Works by African-American Women Artists (1996, Spelman College Museum of Fine Art, Atlanta).

Most recently, Pindell’s work appeared in: We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–1985 (2017, the Brooklyn Museum, New York), Energy/Experimentation: Black Artists and Abstraction, 1964–1980 (2006, The Studio Museum in Harlem), High Times, Hard Times: New York Painting, 1967–1975 (2006, Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Greensboro), WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution (2007, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles), Target Practice: Painting Under Attack, 1949–1978 (2009, Seattle Art Museum), Black in the Abstract: Part I, Epistrophy (2013, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston), and Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age (2015–2016, Museum Brandhorst; 2016, Museum Moderner Kunst).

Pindell’s work is in the permanent collections of major museums internationally, including: the Brooklyn Museum; the Corcoran Gallery of Art; the Fogg Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Copenhagen; the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; The Studio Museum in Harlem; the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C.; the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the Whitney Museum of American Art; and the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven.


Faith Ringgold

Faith Ringgold—a prolific artist, painter, writer, speaker, mixed media sculptor, and performance artist—was born in Harlem, NY in 1930 and currently lives and works in Englewood, NJ. Ms. Ringgold is professor emerita of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).

There is new interest in Ringgold’s long-ignored and politically charged oil paintings from the 1960s, but Ringgold has been known best for her children’s books and painted story quilts. Faith made her first quilt, Echoes of Harlem, in 1980, in collaboration with her mother, Madame Willi Posey. Ringgold’s art is included in many public collections including; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the National Museum of American Art, and the National Museum of Women in the Arts, to name a few.

Ringgold's first published book, Tar Beach, has been in print for over 25 years and has won more than 30 awards including a Caldecott Medal and the Coretta Scott King award for the best illustrated children's book of 1991. Ringgold has written and/or illustrated 20 children's books and is in the process of doing a new book about Ancestors for Harper Collins.

Ringgold is the recipient of more than 75 awards, including the National Endowment for the Arts, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, the New York Foundation for Arts Award, numerous Lifetime Achievement Awards, and 23 Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degrees. Ms. Ringgold is represented by ACA Gallery in New York City.